RED DEVILS IN DEPTH: ST HELENS V SALFORD

It had all looked so promising, and confidence was surely high among the Salford fans, as they travelled over to the Totally Wicked Stadium for their clash with the Saints, on the back of four successive Super League victories, including an extremely rare win over Leeds Rhinos, at Headingley.

The Saints, on the other hand, had had a rather less profitable couple of weeks, and were turning out after having undertaken the somewhat demanding sojourn to the south of France, for their away fixture with Catalans Dragons, all of which were most positive indications for everyone to be encouraged.

 In the end, however, it is all about what happens on the day, and that went contrary to these optimistic expectations, for the Saints had their own expectations and aspirations for the game – the expectations of the current World Club Champions to perform to that level – and took control in the second half to record a 26-12 home victory.

Not that anyone would have even thought that that would happen as the Red Devils turned on the style and swept into a twelve-point lead after only sixteen minutes, with two excellent tries.  The first came in the fifth minute when a totally unexpected, but magnificent, break by prop, King Vuniyayawa, left the Saints defence in his wake, and with the fleet-footed Brodie Croft in support, he fed the stand -off to go in, under the posts.

Andy Ackers it then was, who, eleven minutes later, put Kallum Watkins away down the right and his inside pass to Ryan Brierley saw, along with Marc Sneyd’s second successful conversion attempt, him double the Salford advantage to twelve, which was sufficient for the remaining twenty plus minutes to give them a 6-12 half time lead.

The second half turn around to the home team might lead anyone to regard this as a game of two halves but perhaps, on this occasion an over-simplification, because everything in a game leads on to what follows – more obviously to the more immediate, but also, to an extent, in the longer term.  The loss, for example, of Shane Wright, after a mere few minutes of his introduction denied the team all that he has brought to each game over recent weeks, and also meant that others had to play considerably more minutes, and therefore tired far more quickly as a result.

In fact the roots for this not inconsiderable half time turnaround had been planted during the first half.  There will have been few in attendance or watching tv, on the day, who would have thought, as Sneyd struck the ball to convert Brierley’s try that the Red Devils would fail to add to their score for the remainder of the match, but that was what happened and was something that fed into the St Helens game plan

The visitors had been put under spells of pressure from the outset right through to their first score, and then again between their two tries.  The Salford players had stood up well throughout each of these, as indeed they did throughout some rather more-lengthy spells thereafter, but the fact that these periods of Saints’ dominance became more protracted placed greater and greater demands on the players in terms of energy and concentration.

That these periods soaked up so much time was in part due to the St Helens players’ ability to complete their sets but aided by an increasing number of penalties and set restarts, which went the way of the home side.  Penalties are seldom awarded against teams in possession, the significant  majority are against defenders and, as these defenders start to tire, so their tackling technique suffers and the penalties continue to accrue all the more.

By the time the second half had got underway, the continued Saints’ pressure had started to tell on the Reds, and they immediately conceded yet another penalty, this time whilst in possession, for an incorrect play-the-ball, as early as the third tackle of the half, with a St Helens try coming directly off the back of it.

No-one could possibly question the Red Devils’ effort and commitment at any time during the encounter – without that there was no way they would have limited St Helens to only twenty-six points – but, in the second half, their execution was well below the standards we have become used to, with handling errors from some most wayward of passes seemingly prevalent, and each one presenting the home side with even more possession with which to challenge the Salford defence.

Forthcoming results may well show that in this match St Helens have turned a corner in their season, and that others will find themselves facing the same onslaught of pressure piled upon them, but for Salford players it is important to learn from the outing and fix the elements necessary for a Challenge Cup victory over visiting Huddersfield, next week.

TRIBUTE TO MIKE COULMAN

Everyone at Salford Red Devils is most deeply saddened to learn of the passing of our magnificent, former second row forward, and British Lions Rugby Union forward, Mike Coulman. Back in September 2018, Mike became the first of thus far eleven players of the flamboyant late sixties late seventies Salford team to share their memories of playing for the club, at that time, In tribute to his outstanding contribution to Salford, in a number of capacities, we reproduce here an extract from the finished article, first published 28th October 2018.

Mike takes up the story a few months after his return from a highly successful international rugby union tour of South Africa, with the British Lions:

“I was at home, washing my car on a lovely sunny day, when a Jenson Interceptor Coupe, containing a person who turned out to be the Salford Chairman, drew up at my home,” he relates.   “He didn’t immediately mention signing for Salford, but instead invited me down to watch a couple of games.”

So, a few days later, Mike could have been found at The Willows, gaining his first experience of a rugby league match.  One extremely important catalyst in his willingness to agree to doing so, and then consequently proceeding to sign for the Red Devils, was that he knew that the club’s captain was none other than Welsh Rugby Union International half back, David Watkins, who, it turns out, had been instrumental in shaping Brian Snape’s initial overture.

On his very first visit, Mike found that, not only was the game quite different from union, but so, too, was the whole environment in which he found himself.

“Stafford is a very rural area,” he points out, “and the club ground consists of a couple of acres of land which had been donated to the club, but it had little in the way of facilities, other than a small clubhouse and bar.  In contrast, The Willows was in a residential, urban area, with The Willows Variety Centre at the hub of everything that was happening.  It was all highly professional and impressive, and I quickly became keen to become a part of it.”

The only drawback was that, as a policeman, he was not able to have another job alongside that, so, having made his decision to make the move, it was also going to involve not only the end to his rugby union career, but also a complete change of lifestyle involving a move up north to live in Marple, and taking up a new career working in The Variety Centre.

His first match came immediately after making the change of code, away at the old Athletic Stadium, former home of Rochdale Hornets, in a Division 1 league fixture.

“Nowadays, you would have been required to have put in at least a week’s worth of training,” he considers, “but for me, back then, I was put straight into the team.   Although we were professional to a degree, we were not as professional as things are now.”

It was in this game that he donned, for the first time, the number eleven jersey which was to become his own, until making the move up front to open-side prop, in the mid-seventies.

“I was always number eleven, because that was the second-row position on the blindside of the scrum,” he explains.  “Obviously, it was a very steep learning curve for me.  I just went through the game being told to stand here, and then there, and when the ball did eventually come to me, I just had to go forward and make as much progress as a I possibly could.

“It took around a quarter of the season for me to begin to feel settled into the game and begin holding my own in the team.”

His arrival at the club coincided with that of a player, who, not only was to become a very close personal friend, but who also, as his fellow second rower in those early days, was to become Mike’s mentor and guiding light, died-in-the-wool rugby league international, Colin Dixon.

“He was my best pal throughout my whole time with Salford,” Mike confides, and, pointing to a small tree in the middle of his lawn, continues, “I planted that in memory of him.  That is his.”

So close did the two become that Mike attributes much of his later success directly to Colin.

“He was such a great help, not so much for anything he said, but in his actions.  I always kept my eye on him and noted the things he did, and then tried them out myself.  I just owe so much to him.”

Part of the arrangements under which Mike came to Salford was that during the week he would work for Chairman, Brian Snape, in his Stanneylands restaurant in Manchester city centre, where he started to learn, in considerable detail, everything connected with the catering industry.  This was to stand him in good stead ahead of a flourishing career throughout his life, in this area.

“I went on to work for Whitbreads, for whom I managed twenty sites, some with hotels.  That carried great responsibility as there was well over a million pounds tied up in them all.  The move from union to league totally transformed my life.”

Not only that, he also found that once he had settled into the game, there were aspects of it which he much preferred to rugby union, particularly the high level of professionalism throughout the sport.

“I found rugby union far more sociable, but lacking professionalism in terms of the game, and, as a player, you want to be able to progress and develop to the best you can be.  I certainly have no regrets whatsoever about having made the move, although the three months British Lions Rugby Union tour still remains my lifetime’s highlight.”

Nevertheless, there were highlights still to be gained in his newly found affection for rugby league, starting in 1969 with what was destined to be Salford’s first post-war visit to Wembley, which remarkably he can remember in detail.

“The game went by in a flash but I didn’t play well at all.  Certainly not as well as I think I should have done.  I didn’t do enough tackling, probably because the big strength of my game was my physical prowess in carrying the ball, but even in this I felt I lacked aggression, on the day,” he ruefully reflects.  “I just would have liked to have played better than I did.”

Wembley is a hard place to go to and then to come away with nothing, as it is always going to be for fifty percent of the protagonists.

“I never liked losing any match, but you just have to be resilient, put it all in the past, and then turn your attention to the next season, which thankfully is what all the lads did,” he comments.

And indeed, with two First Division Championship successes in 1973/4 and again in 1975/6, to come, there were still successes, aplenty, awaiting him.

“The longevity of that Championship Trophy, coupled with the style with which we won it, on those two occasions, made it very special to us all.  To win it twice, and so close in time, was absolutely marvellous,” is his wholly justifiable assessment.

“We played with a great deal of skill and considerable guile in that period.  I scored a hundred and forty tries in my time with Salford, most of which came during that particular period of the early to mid-seventies, and which I consider was the peak of our time together as a team.”

In sharp contrast, he readily acknowledges that they failed to do themselves justice in the one-off rugby which is the Challenge Cup.  Every year, the atmosphere around The Willows was electric with the anticipation that, that year, they would be getting to Wembley, which was not only every player’s dream, but also every fan’s – only for these hopes to be dashed by ball number twenty-three, without any variation  from season to season, being drawn out for a second or third round journey to West Yorkshire, to face might of Leeds, at Headingly, or Castleford, at Wheldon Rd.

This, however, was the only blip in what was an exceptional period of the club’s history.  And so it should have been with the star studded side which they were able to raise, week in and week out, for, as so often happens with a team brimming with talent, injuries were few and far between.

Indeed, pace was the ingredient throughout the whole team, with Mike himself and Colin Dixon, in the second row possessing the pace of any back to score long distance tries during which they would draw further and further away from their chasing opponents before invariably grounding under the posts.

As the season’s passed, and the years started to catch up on them all, changes within the squad and around team selection understandably, took place.  For Mike, this led to a change of position, with his making the move up front to prop. In 1977.

“Throughout my rugby union career, I had always played at prop, and during my time in the second row, it had always been in the back of mind that I would one day return there, which I did for my final three seasons.”

Obviously, as certain players reached retirement age, and others moved on to join other clubs, a gradual dip in performance and results started to become apparent.  For Mike though, there were other problems with which to contend.

“It was about that time I started to develop injury problems with my knees.  I started to miss more and more games, and eventually had to undergo surgery.”

Nevertheless, what he achieved as a player was absolutely outstanding, with, most remarkably, his attaining an international cap, at every level from schoolboy, right through to full international level, in both codes.

He even attained a most unusual international experience, alongside the rest of the squad, playing in a friendly against the French, in a Salford jersey, down in the south of France.

“We travelled down by private jet, and the whole trip down there was a most enjoyable experience, even though we were on the receiving end of a hefty defeat.”

His proudest claim to fame of all, however, came in what was the third and deciding test match against the Australians, in The Sydney Cricket Ground, when he got the better with a perhaps questionable tackle on one of the opposing Australian forwards (thought to be the formidable Artie Beetson), who was left lying prostrate on the ground, for a number of minutes.

“The referee warned me that if he didn’t get up, I would be walking up the tunnel.”

Fortunately for Mike, the Australian medical staff were up to the challenge, and Mike duly remained on field to contribute further to the remainder of the game. IIt was, nevertheless, most out of character for the usually calm and compliant Coulman, who in this day and age, would have suffered a spell in the sinbin, at least, had things not been so different then.

“I was geed up purely by his stature.  Also, the fact that we were playing on an Australian cricket ground, which was rock hard, because unlike Headingley, where they are two separate pitches, this was all on the same area, and I was determined to make an impression.”

With so many of his Salford teammates in the Great Britain side – indeed the Red Devils commanded almost the whole of the backline, with Mike and Colin Dixon pairing up in the back row – playing for his country seemed little different than any away game for Salford, particularly when they found themselves staying in the same hotels used by the Red Devils.

After having played under various coaches, 1982 saw Mike, by then in his fourteenth year, appointed to the position of player-coach, before eventually hanging up his boots to concentrate on coaching. Not that he looks back on his coaching career with any great satisfaction, as he did not really find himself best cut out for the position.

“I simply am not an aggressive person, and I do feel that that was the problem throughout my whole rugby career. I always felt that it was best just to play each other without ever having the desire to inflict physical harm on anyone. Consequently, in the role of coaching, that required degree os aggression was lacking.

The playing career of a professional sportsman is exceptionally short, with most rugby league players managing a maximum of ten years at the top, but Mike found that the reputation and aura he had built up in the local area, during his days in the red, number eleven, jersey have followed and stayed with him throughout his life, and, that he then has had more time to return to  the club for occasional games, where he has been overwhelmed by the respect and bonhomie he has received.

“The number of people who come up to me wanting to speak and shake hands is unbelievable, and it makes me feel so proud that I could almost cry.”

Those of us who know him, or have had the pleasure and privilege of seeing him play for the team, would undoubtedly respond by saying that this is merely fitting respect for a truly great man who throughout his playing days, and beyond, has been an absolute credit to rugby league, rugby union, Salford, and himself.

U19S TAKE ADVANTAGE OF FAIR-WEATHER CONDITIONS

Hull 14  Salford 44                            Match Report

We so often are forced to report of how poor weather and difficult playing conditions have prevented teams from delivering the best of performances, but Salford’s U19s turned that tale on its head, on Wednesday afternoon, by producing a top class performance to return form Hull with the most convincing of wins.

Visits to Humberside are seldom fruitful in terms of points scored, or victories won, but the buoyant Red Devils took advantage of the chance of showing just what they could do, with ball in hand, when the elements are on their side, to overcome the endeavours of their hosts by a clean thirty points.

Their ascendency and dominance had to be earned, however, for in the early stages there was little to choose between the teams, with both sides testing each other to the full.  Indeed, the Reds’ defence had to be at its best, during this period, to withstand the degree of pressure under which it was placed.   So much so, that Euan Hayes’s opening score was quickly countered by the Yorkshiremen, leaving only Jack Stevens’s conversion to separate the sides.

The Red Devils’ pack, however, had done so much, by then, to get on top, that it was only a matter of time before their lead was extended by Josh Wagstaffe’s converted try, and suddenly they were on a roll, with further tries taking the half time score to 4-22.

Try as they might, the home side, thereafter, were seldom in the hunt, as the Salford forwards continued to lay the platform from which the backs were able to produce some enterprising and enjoyable rugby.  When required to do so, however, their defensive effort was such that it not only repelled the attack with competence, it also forced a number of handling errors from the opposition which unsettled them even further.

And so the tries continued, into the second half, with Hull getting in on the act, with two of their own towards the end of the game, the second of which was converted, but by then the Reds had notched up forty points, and still added a final one in between the two from their hosts.

Coach Danny Barton, was, understandably, delighted with his charges, their attitude, their efforts, and the performance,

He summed it up, thus, “Hull is an extremely tough place to go, but the conditions were good, and both teams tried to take advantage of this by playing fast, open, rugby.  We just did it a little better than they did.

“I was particularly delighted with one try, in which the ball was swept beautifully along the line from right to left, with our winger, Myles Paul, crossing in the corner.  Everything in that move just came right, including the insertion of fullback, Nathan Connel, into the line, to provide the extra man.”

Next week, the U19s will be entering a team into the nine-aside competition, at Headingley, whilst April 20th will bring their final home match of the season against Furness Raiders.

Salford Scorers:

Tries: Euan Hayes, Josh Wagstaffe (2), Myles Paul, Jack Stevens, Ellis Kelly, Louis Lord, Nathan Connell

Goals: Jack Stevens (6)

Flashback | Leeds Rhinos 20-30 Salford Red Devils | 13th April 2009

Salford have had a torrid time over the years at Headingley winning just once at Leeds in the summer era – so it wasn’t difficult to choose this weeks ‘flashback’.
It was The Red Devils first season back in the Super League following promotion via the licensing system and Shaun McRae’s side earned their third victory of the season, and their first away from home, against eventual 2009 League Leaders’ Shield winners and Super League winners Leeds Rhinos.
The visitors raced into an impressive 22-6 by the 50th minute. John Wilshere opened the scoring for Salford on the back of a clever grubber kick from Richie Myler. Mark Henry soon extended the lead as he touched down in the corner after some flowing hands down the line.
Jamie Jones Buchanan soon crossed for the Rhinos to narrow the arrears but a mistake from Ali Lauititi was pounced on by Myler who then went 70 metres to finish a magnificient solo effort.
Myler’s kicking game was causing issues for the Rhinos and Robbie Paul benefitted when one of Myler’s grubber kicks richocheted into the half-backs arms to score. Wilshere converted to give Salford a 22-6 lead.
But, Leeds wouldn’t go down without a fight as Keith Senior and Ryan Hall linked up well with the latter scoring. Wilshere attempted to slow down a Rhinos comeback with a long-range penalty goal but some good play from Kevin Sinfield and Jones-Buchanan allowed Senior to score before Jamie Peacock barrelled his way over with seven minutes remaining.
The Red Devils led by just four points heading into the closing stages but they managed to crush any hopes of a late Rhinos victory thanks to another breakaway try. A Leeds pass went to ground before being latched onto by Jordan Turner who went 60 metres to score. Wilshere added the extras to give Salford their first ever Super League victory over the Rhinos.
The teams that day – April 13th 2009
Salford: Wilshere, Henry, Littler, Turner, Ratchford; Smith, Myler; Cashmere, Alker, Stapleton, Adamson, Parker, Swain. Interchanges: Sibbit, Leuluai, Paul, Jewitt.
Leeds: Webb, Jones-Bishop, Ablett, Senior, Hall; McGuire, Burrow; Burgess, Diskin, Bailey, Jones-Buchanan, Kirke, Sinfield. Interchanges: Leuluai, Lauititi, Peacock, Buderus.

Leeds Rhinos 44-2 Salford Red Devils

Any hopes of a top four finish were dashed for the Red Devils after another disappointing evening at Headingley as Salford fell to a 44-2 defeat.
Leeds had already confirmed their position in the Super League semi-finals however they didn’t slow down against a Salford side looking for just their 2nd ever Super League victory at Headingley.
Following an impressive victory over Huddersfield last weekend Watson had to make some changes with Ben Murdoch-Masila moving into the centres for an injured Kris Welham while George Griffin also returned to the side.
Salford did take the lead in the early stages as Gareth O’Brien kicked a penalty goal but Leeds soon took control with a try from Liam Sutcliffe who spun over the line. The Rhinos made it two in quick succession as Rob Burrow broke from deep before finding Danny McGuire who went under the posts. Watkins converted both.
The Red Devils were very much still in the game at half-time trailing 16-2 after Tom Briscoe capatalised on some quick hands from the hosts but Leeds’ dominance continued in after the break.
Interchange hooker Matt Parcell jinked his way over from close-range to extend the lead. McGuire was instrumental in the middle and his kick was latched on to by Adam Cuthbertson before Parcell grabbed his second and Leeds’ third in eight minutes to open up a 30-point lead.
Anthony Mullally barged his way over and with ten minutes remaining Brett Ferres finished off a flowing Leeds move which involved a break from deep by Ashton Golding before a neat kick from McGuire.
Rhinos: Golding, Briscoe, Watkins, Sutcliffe, Hall; Moon, McGuire; Cuthbertson, Burrow, Garbutt, Ward, Jones-Buchanan, Singleton. Interchanges: Mullally, Ferres, Parcell, Delaney.
Red Devils: Evalds, Bibby, Murdoch-Masila, Sa’u, Vatuvei; Lui, O’Brien; Kopczak, Tomkins, Hauraki, Jones, Griffin, McCarthy. Interchanges: Lannon, A. Walne, J. Walne, Brining.
Referee: Liam Moore. Touch Judges: Richard Thompson & Jonathan Roberts. Attendance: 13094

Factfile – Leeds Rhinos vs Salford Red Devils

Head-to-Head
Salford’s record against the Rhinos since the incarnation of Super League doesn’t make for pretty reading with just two wins in 40 Super League fixtures. However, the Red Devils did overcome Leeds last season with a 14-10 victory at home. But, the Red Devils haven’t been as fortunate at Headingley with just one win at Leeds in over twenty years.
The victory was a 20-30 triumph back in 2009 with youngsters such as Richie Myler, Stefan Ratchford and Jordan Turner all featuring for the Red Devils. The win was made even more impressive due to the fact Salford had just been promoted and the Rhinos would go on to win both the League Leaders’ Shield and the Super League that season.
Milestones
Last weekend Kris Welham crossed twice as the Red Devils cruised past Huddersfield with a 52-14 victory at the The Salford Stadium. Welham’s first marked his 100th Super League try before he then notched his 1o1st just 25 minutes later. The centre has scored 90 Super League tries for his former side Hull KR and has now grabbed 11 tries in the league for the Red Devils this season.
George Griffin, who is included in this weekend’s 19-man squad after being injured last weekend, could also be set to make his 100th Super League appearance. Griffin has appeared in Super League 18 times for Hull KR, 19 times for London Broncos, 5 times for Wakefield and has now featured 57 times since arriving at the The Salford Stadium back in 2015.
Try-scorers
While the Red Devils are yet to beat Leeds this season they did come close in February losing out 14-20. Logan Tomkins grabbed his only try of the season in the defeat at Headingley earlier in the season. Tomkins also crossed the last time the Red Devils beat Leeds back in 2016 while Josh Wood, who started at hooker the last time the sides met, also scored from acting half-back.
Ben Murdoch-Masila didn’t feature in the trop to Headingley at the start of the 2017 season however he managed to power his way over twice when Salford welcomed Leeds to the The Salford Stadium in July. Murdoch-Masila is currently level with full-back Niall Evalds as the Red Devils top Super League try-scorer.
 
Tickets are on sale for our final home game of the 2017 season against St Helens on Thursday 21st September. Tickets can be purchased over the phone, at the Club Ticket Office or online here. Supporters are reminded that season tickets are valid for all Super 8s home games but are encouraged to look at our fantastic hospitality offer for them for our final home game. 

Travel Guide – Leeds Rhinos

The Red Devils travel to Headingley on Friday night to take on Leeds Rhinos in our penultimate game of the Super 8s and here is a guide for all the fans heading to the game.
Tickets
Matchday ticket prices are as follows:
Adults: £22
Concessions (Students, 65+ and 17-21): £15
Juniors (16 and under): £12
Junior Season Ticker holders must exchange their pass for a ticket before travelling. There will be no exchanging on the turnstiles.
The ticket collection point is located on St. Michaels Lane. Tickets can be collected from 5pm before this ticket collections are via the Club shop.
Turnstiles open three hours prior to kick-off and Red Devils fans can use the St. Michaels Lane and Kirkstall Lane turnstiles. Programmes are £3 and can be purchased at the Club Shop, Ticket Office or from one of the programme sellers situated around Headingley.
Parking
There is no parking available for the general public on site on matchdays however street parking around the stadium is available but some streets are permit holders only. There is also no disabled parking on site for this game but again street parking is available.
All coach parking is available of St. Michaels Lane near the allotments. There is no access via the railway bridge on St. Michaels Lane for coaches. Contact the Leeds Ticket Office on 1371 423 1315 for more details.
Coach
The coach is £14:00 for all classes and all the coach pick-up points for Friday’s game against Leeds are as follows:
Chandos Sports and Social – 16:45
Royal Sovereign – 17:00
Eccles Town Hall – 17:10
Dog and Partridge – 17:20
Barley Farm – 17:40
Supporters are reminded that if they park at the The Salford Stadium before their coach pick up they will be charged £7 due to the car park being under gameday regulations due to Sale Sharks facing London Irish.
However, there will be FREE parking in and around the other coach pick-up points. It is not the decision of the Red Devils to charge the fans for parking but that of the The Salford Stadium and the Red Devils will receive none of this money. We’d like to apologise for any inconvenience and we hope you all enjoy Friday’s trip to Leeds.
 
Tickets are also still available for our final home game of the 2017 season against St Helens on Thursday 21st September. Tickets can be purchased over the phone, at the Club Ticket Office or online here. Season Ticket holders are reminded that their Season Tickets are valid for all Super 8s home games but are encouraged to look at our hospitality deal for Season Ticket holders against St Helens. 

Ian Watson confirms 19-man squad for trip to Leeds

Ian Watson has named his 19-man squad for the Red Devils trip to Headingley to take on Leeds Rhinos on Friday night.
George Griffin returns to the 19-man squad after suffering from a knock sustained last week. Daniel Murray also enters the fray after not featuring since the defeat to Castleford in early August. Olsi Krasniqi is left out of the squad for Friday night’s game.
Greg Johnson was named in last week’s squad but had to pull out through with a hip injury late in the week which means he drops from this week’s 19-man squad. Jake Bibby is likely to start on the wing again after scoring a try last weekend against Huddersfield.
Gareth O’Brien moved into the halves last week and looks to be set to partner Robert Lui again with both Michael Dobson and Todd Carney absent from the 19-man squad.
Tickets are also available for our final home game of the 2017 season against St Helens on Thursday 21st September and are available over the phone, at the club ticket office and online here. Season ticket holders are reminded that their season tickets are valid for all Super 8s home games but are encouraged to look at our hospitality deal for season ticket holders against Saints.

Season ticket holders can still purchase Leeds tickets

Season ticket holders have until Thursday evening to secure their tickets for the upcoming trip to Leeds Rhinos on Friday 15th September.
The Red Devils have received a limited allocation of just over 400 tickets due to renovations on Headingley’s South Stand and therefore tickets have been offered to season ticket holders exclusively for the opening week.
Season ticket holders are reminded that the ticket office is open from 9am-9:30pm on Wednesday and Thursday for them to buy their tickets for the Leeds game.
Tickets are set to go on general sale at 9am Friday 8th September.
Ticket prices are as follows:
Adults: £20
Seniors (65+): £13
Students: £13
Under 21’s: £13
Juniors (16 and under): £10
Junior season ticket holders are free of charge and will require a ticket. Junior season ticket holders must exchange their voucher in advance. There will be no option to exchange on the day.
Tickets are also available for both our remaining home Super 8s fixtures against Huddersfield Giants and St Helens and can be purchased at the club ticket office, over the phone or online here. Season ticket holders are reminded that their season tickets are valid for all Super 8s home games.

Support Paul Highton on his ride to Wembley

Former Red Devil Paul Highton is cycling from Leeds to Wembley Stadium for Rugby League Cares. The cycle started at Headingley Stadium, 8am on Monday 21st, and the team of 15 riders are set to arrive at the Wembley Legends statue on the eve of the 2017 Challenge Cup final – Friday 25th August.
Highton, speaking to Rugby League cares, said: “Cycling to Rio was one of the best experiences of my life and though the ride to Wembley is shorter, it’s going to be a fantastic five days.
“We may not have to cross the Pyrenees to reach our destination but this ride isn’t about mountain ranges or distance, it’s about overcoming the challenge of negotiating a testing off-road route.
“I’m expecting it to be tough: the bike is heavier for a start; I’m a year older and the nettles and brambles along the way are really going to hurt!
“Firstly, I’d say that nothing is going to be as tough as that first day when you don’t know what to expect your body is going to react to spending eight hours and more in the saddle.
“That feeling is like nothing else,” he added.
“Secondly, it’s important to keep your head up and take in what’s around you: how many people get to experience the beautiful countryside we have in the UK at such close quarters for five days? Soak it up!
“Finally, make sure you have a laugh: yes, there will be dark moments, and days when it feels tough, but the sun always comes out again and riding as a team is a real breeze, especially when you know you’re doing it for such a worthy cause.”
‘Highto’ has made big contributions to the men’s health and wellbeing project ‘Offload’ and has worked in conjunction with club foundations at Salford Red Devils, Widnes Vikings and Warrington Wolves.
Highton said: “Some of the impact Offload has made to the people involved has been nothing short of amazing.
“No-one was quite sure at the start whether men would buy into it but it’s been a transformational experience for a lot of people.
“The bonds that have been forged between the participants are really uplifting to witness. At Warrington, one member of the team said he was worried how he’d fill the void in his life after his 12 fixtures were up and they’ve all agreed to carry on meeting to support each other.
“It’s made a profound difference to the lives of a lot of men who previously felt they had no-where else to turn.”
To sponsor Paul, please visit his Just Giving page –  www.justgiving.com/fundraising/Paul-Highton.
 

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