MATCH PREVIEW – LEEDS RHINOS VS SALFORD RED DEVILS (BETFRED SUPER LEAGUE ROUND 11)

The Betfred Super League is back and Salford Red Devils will be looking to build-on some pre-international break momentum against Leeds Rhinos at Headingley.

After ten matches, Paul Rowley’s side have picked-up six crucial victories and sit join-fourth in the table.

Consistent injury trouble has hit key personnel in the team, so to be in the winner’s circle at this point has taken tremendous effort from the entire squad.

Before the break, the Red Devils’ had strung together three consecutive league victories and were starting to build some real momentum.

Maybe the pause came at the wrong time, but a rest and recharged team are now ready to hit the ground running ahead of two tricky away fixtures.

Standing in their way in Round 11 is Rohan Smith’s Rhinos’ side.

The eight-time Super League winners have had a steady start to the season, with five wins and five losses.

But last year’s Grand Finalist’s will be wanting to go one step further this time around, so will need to start picking up more consistent victories as the season progresses.

Here’s everything you need to know before this one…


SQUAD NEWS

Despite the break, due to the nature of some injuries, the 21-man squad has very few changes since our last outing against Catalans Dragons.

Alex Gerrard is back in the fold, however.

The prop/loose forward has been out for virtually the entire campaign so far, so will be a welcome boost for Paul Rowley and his staff ahead of a crucial stage in the season .


ROWLEY’S PREVIEW

After a short break away, our Head Coach, Paul Rowley addressed the media earlier this week.

With nearly two weeks since our last game, there was a lot to catch up on; including squad fitness, what he expects from Leeds, and the club’s recently launched community benefit offer.

On today’s opposition, Rowley said: “They’re certainly good athletically. They’re a big side, so they’re big in stature – they’re quick.

“So I think they’re a very dangerous team and they’ve shown that recently by getting to a Grand Final last year with pretty much the same team.

“They’re more than capable of hurting teams, but like you said, they’ve allowed teams to do the same to them. Unpredictable, but very dangerous is the messages that we’ll take from that!”

Watch Rowley’s press conference in full by clicking HERE!


HOW TO BUY TICKETS!

Tickets for our Round 11 clash are available to buy/collect from the Salford Stadium until 12pm today. After this time, all collections will be taken to the Headingley Stadium ticket office. Click HERE to secure your place!

Pay on the day is also available.


AWAY FAN INFORMATION

TRAVELLING TO HEADINGLEY

Please ensure however you choose to travel to the stadium you do it safely and where possible sustainably. Turnstiles for a Betfred Super League home game will open at 3 hours before kick-off so please allow plenty of time to arrive at the stadium and help with the safe entry for all spectators into the ground.

To keep an eye on possible road closures here – https://one.network/uk/leeds

Please plan your journey accordingly and allow plenty of time to arrive at the stadium. Leeds Rhinos have been taking part in a research project on sustainable travel and we have brought in a new travel assistant service that gives you the best low-emission travel options, tailored routes and personalised travel updates when travelling to Leeds Rhinos matches this season. 

If you are not travelling on Official Club Travel, please use our Leeds Rhinos Journey Planner here https://travel.yousmartthing.com/Leeds_Rhinos_V_Salford_Red_Devils_5_May

ACCESS TO THE STADIUM

All away fan access is through the Kirkstall Lane (Gate G) turnstiles which is stated on the tickets that have been purchased directly through your ticket office / club shop.

If travelling on your official club travel, you will be parked on Beechwood Crescent allotments and you will be able to access the stadium by crossing the small railway bridge*. Once across the bridge head up the pedestrian footpath in between Gate F and Gate E which will lead you straight to Kirkstall Lane (Gate G) turnstiles.

CAR PARKING

There is no parking available at the stadium and all parking is on street.

Please remember, Headingley Stadium is situated in a residential area and we ask that you ensure you respect our neighbours when arriving and departing the stadium for matches.

Please ensure if you are parking your vehicle in the surrounding streets that you do it sensibly, you dispose of any waste responsibly, and finally, remain on public highways and keep noise levels to a minimum.


RED DEVILS IN DEPTH: LEEDS V SALFORD

At the time, it all looked so familiar – a journey to Leeds in such a positive frame of mind after that tremendous victory over St Helens, followed by the re-awakening to reality of most trips to Headingley Stadium, with Leeds ramping up an eighteen lead, which they later expanded to thirty-two.

With hindsight, however, it was not like that in its entirety, for that was only half the tale.  True the Rhinos made an extremely good start, tearing through the visitors’ defence in the very first set of the game, to notch their first six pointer after only forty-five seconds, owing to a missed tackle on the left edge during the build-up.

Six minutes later, Dan Sarginson, with the sun glaring into his eyes, slightly misjudged the flight of the ball from a high bomb, which gave Myler, who was moving forward onto it at pace, the chance he needed to take it on the full for their second, whilst some rather soft tackling on Martin allowed the Leeds second-rower to force his way over the line to register an eighteen points lead on fifteen minutes, having been aided by a penalty and two set restarts.

Even then, despite what the scoreboard showed, it had not been only Leeds, throughout that opening period.  Five minutes into the game, and with the score at only six points, Deon Cross appeared to have scored, only for it to be ruled out owing to a Salford touch forward in flight, from the preceding high kick.  Indeed, the number of tries the Reds had disallowed over the whole game, would, if converted, have been enough to have put them in position to win the game.

‘Nearly’, and ‘almost’, even ‘disputed’, mean nothing, however, in terms of points, so it was not until the first quarter of the game had elapsed that the Reds started to get back into it.  In fact, it was on the twentieth minute that Salford’s first points were gained, with an end-of–set kick being caught and passed along the line to left winger, Joe Burgess, in space, for him to cross in the corner.

Eight minutes later, a kick into the corner forced a Leeds goal-line drop-out, which preluded a passing move of the slickest of handling, which started by going to the left, at which point it reversed and went from left to right, ending with a wide pass from Watkins to Ken Sio, to reduce the Rhino’s lead further.

Without a successful conversion attempt for either of the two tries, though, overtaking Leeds’s eighteen points was always going to be an uphill battle, and if only Brodie Croft’s dance through their defence, on 34 mins, had been grounded to the referee’s satisfaction, it would have reduced it by the full six points, being, as it was, close to the posts.

They therefore had to wait until the 49th minute, for Croft to repeat his effort, this time having a much easier, clear-cut act of grounding, and at this point the Rhinos were really shaken.  The whole story of the second half, thus far, had been that of total Salford dominance, as, in fact, had the final quarter of the first half.

Virtually every set of possession, during the second forty had seen the Red Devils charging upfield, making in the region of sixty to eighty metres in each set, to the extent that the Leeds players looked almost completely out of energy, and there for the taking.  So confident were the visitors that they even scorned taking a penalty kick at goal, from directly in front of the posts, and even though they failed to score from the resultant set, it seemed almost inevitable that they would take the lead before long.

Sadly, this proved not to be the case, and a penalty goal took Leeds to six points ahead, and suddenly the balance of the game seemed to have swung the other way.  The Rhinos’ defence now appeared more resolute, and their reserves of energy had obviously been replenished by the reintroduction of some of their starting players, and others who had been spelled during the game.

Consequently, when an attacking pass to the right was intercepted by Super League’s top poacher, Handley, to race ninety metres for a try, the Salford players must have found this a little dispiriting, so much so that their grip on the game began to lessen.

Another Leeds penalty goal to accompany the sin-binning of Sitaleki Akauola, increased the home lead to 28-14, and the twelve remaining Salford players were then unable to hold out against Martin’s scoring his second try, which alongside his highly successful goal-kicking, had done so much to damage Salford’s aspirations.

So the Headingley jinx remains, but there was just so much that was positive, in that mid-match period.  Indeed, for a neutral spectator it must have been a wonderful whole afternoon’s spectacle of attacking rugby from both sides – presumably exactly what had been envisaged by those who had first advocated and instigated summer rugby – and many of us were there to enjoy it.  Winning would, of course, have capped it all, but maybe we should not let the result completely deprive us of the enjoyment and excitement our team’s performance contributed to such an entertaining match.

RED DEVILS IN DEPTH: LEEDS V SALFORD

At the time, it all looked so familiar – a journey to Leeds in such a positive frame of mind after that tremendous victory over St Helens, followed by the re-awakening to reality of most trips to Headingley Stadium, with Leeds ramping up an eighteen lead, which they later expanded to thirty-two.

With hindsight, however, it was not like that in its entirety, for that was only half the tale.  True the Rhinos made an extremely good start, tearing through the visitors’ defence in the very first set of the game, to notch their first six pointer after only forty-five seconds, owing to a missed tackle on the left edge during the build-up.

Six minutes later, Dan Sarginson, with the sun glaring into his eyes, slightly misjudged the flight of the ball from a high bomb, which gave Myler, who was moving forward onto it at pace, the chance he needed to take it on the full for their second, whilst some rather soft tackling on Martin allowed the Leeds second-rower to force his way over the line to register an eighteen points lead on fifteen minutes, having been aided by a penalty and two set restarts.

Even then, despite what the scoreboard showed, it had not been only Leeds, throughout that opening period.  Five minutes into the game, and with the score at only six points, Deon Cross appeared to have scored, only for it to be ruled out owing to a Salford touch forward in flight, from the preceding high kick.  Indeed, the number of tries the Reds had disallowed over the whole game, would, if converted, have been enough to have put them in position to win the game.

‘Nearly’, and ‘almost’, even ‘disputed’, mean nothing, however, in terms of points, so it was not until the first quarter of the game had elapsed that the Reds started to get back into it.  In fact, it was on the twentieth minute that Salford’s first points were gained, with an end-of–set kick being caught and passed along the line to left winger, Joe Burgess, in space, for him to cross in the corner.

Eight minutes later, a kick into the corner forced a Leeds goal-line drop-out, which preluded a passing move of the slickest of handling, which started by going to the left, at which point it reversed and went from left to right, ending with a wide pass from Watkins to Ken Sio, to reduce the Rhino’s lead further.

Without a successful conversion attempt for either of the two tries, though, overtaking Leeds’s eighteen points was always going to be an uphill battle, and if only Brodie Croft’s dance through their defence, on 34 mins, had been grounded to the referee’s satisfaction, it would have reduced it by the full six points, being, as it was, close to the posts.

They therefore had to wait until the 49th minute, for Croft to repeat his effort, this time having a much easier, clear-cut act of grounding, and at this point the Rhinos were really shaken.  The whole story of the second half, thus far, had been that of total Salford dominance, as, in fact, had the final quarter of the first half.

Virtually every set of possession, during the second forty had seen the Red Devils charging upfield, making in the region of sixty to eighty metres in each set, to the extent that the Leeds players looked almost completely out of energy, and there for the taking.  So confident were the visitors that they even scorned taking a penalty kick at goal, from directly in front of the posts, and even though they failed to score from the resultant set, it seemed almost inevitable that they would take the lead before long.

Sadly, this proved not to be the case, and a penalty goal took Leeds to six points ahead, and suddenly the balance of the game seemed to have swung the other way.  The Rhinos’ defence now appeared more resolute, and their reserves of energy had obviously been replenished by the reintroduction of some of their starting players, and others who had been spelled during the game.

Consequently, when an attacking pass to the right was intercepted by Super League’s top poacher, Handley, to race ninety metres for a try, the Salford players must have found this a little dispiriting, so much so that their grip on the game began to lessen.

Another Leeds penalty goal to accompany the sin-binning of Sitaleki Akauola, increased the home lead to 28-14, and the twelve remaining Salford players were then unable to hold out against Martin’s scoring his second try, which alongside his highly successful goal-kicking, had done so much to damage Salford’s aspirations.

So the Headingley jinx remains, but there was just so much that was positive, in that mid-match period.  Indeed, for a neutral spectator it must have been a wonderful whole afternoon’s spectacle of attacking rugby from both sides – presumably exactly what had been envisaged by those who had first advocated and instigated summer rugby – and many of us were there to enjoy it.  Winning would, of course, have capped it all, but maybe we should not let the result completely deprive us of the enjoyment and excitement our team’s performance contributed to such an entertaining match.

Leeds tickets now on general sale

Tickets for our away game with Leeds Rhinos on Friday 15th September at Headingley Stadium are now on general sale.
The Red Devils have been allocated with just over 400 tickets due to ongoing renovations on Leeds’ South Stand. Tickets were initially offered solely to season ticket holders however with just under half remaining they are now open to non-season ticket holders.
The ticket prices are as follows:
Ticket prices are as follows:
Adults: £20
Seniors (65+): £13
Students: £13
Under 21’s: £13
Juniors (16 and under): £10
Junior season ticket holders are free of charge and will require a ticket. Junior season ticket holders must exchange their voucher in advance. There will be no option to exchange on the day.
Coach information for the trip to Leeds is as follows:
Chandos Sports and Social: 16:45
Royal Sovereign: 17:00
Eccles Town Hall: 17:00
Dog and Partridge: 17:20
Barley Farm: 17:40
A place on the coach is £14:00 for all classes.
Tickets are also still available for both of our remaining Super 8s home games against Huddersfield and St Helens and can be purchased at the club ticket office, over the phone and online via the club website here.

Ticket details for all our remaining Super 8s games

Tickets are on sale for each of our three remaining Super 8s games against Huddersfield, Leeds and St Helens.
The Red Devils next home game is on Saturday 9th September against Huddersfield and will kick-off at 1:30pm. Our final home game of the season is against St Helens on the Saturday 23rd September however this fixture is subject to change should Sky Sports choose to broadcast it.
Tickets can be purchased at the club ticket office, over the phone or online here. Ticket prices are as follows:
West Stand (Seated)
Adult: £25
Concession: £20
Junior (Under 17): £10
West Stand Value Section (Seated)
Adult: £18
Concession: £13
Junior (Under 17): £10
South Stand (Standing)
Adult: £20
Concession: £15
Junior (Under 17): £10
Under 6’s can enter free but must collect a ticket from the ticket office prior to entry.
Season ticket holders are reminded that their season tickets are valid for all Super 8s home games.
Tickets for our final away game of the season on Friday 15th September against Leeds Rhinos are on sale but are exclusive to season ticket holders up until Thursday evening.
This is due to renovations on Headingley Stadium’s South Stand limiting our allocation to just over 400 tickets. Season ticket holders can buy their tickets at the club ticket office or over the phone up until Thursday evening.
Remaining tickets will go on general sale Friday morning meaning tickets can be purchased at the Huddersfield home game should there be tickets remaining. Junior swaps are available for the game but will need to be exchanged prior to gameday.
Ticket prices are as follows:
Adults: £20
Seniors (65+): £13
Students: £13
Under 21’s: £13
Juniors (16 and under): £10
To read coach information for the upcoming trip to Leeds click here. Remember, the Red Devils receive 25% of any away tickets that are bought in advance.

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