RED DEVILS IN DEPTH:  SALFORD V WARRINGTON

After two back-to-back games in one weekend, Red Devils’ Head Coach, Paul Rowley, rewarded the team, which had, most remarkably, won both, and doing so straight after an energy-sapping trip to Catalans, by giving them what one would suspect they desired most of all, a well-earned rest.  The consequence of this was that the team given the task of facing the Wolves, at the weekend, was a rather makeshift group.

With six players from the Reserves making their debuts, and other more experienced players selected in most unfamiliar positions, expectations, among fans, of a victory were not high, and those expectations proved correct.  What, however, was not correct was the fear that the side might get swept aside by an opposition keen to make the most of what they regarded as a winnable match.

Far from that, although struggling in the early stages to adapt to new positions, the speed of the game, and one another, they grew into it extremely well, and the longer it went on the more they forced the visitors into handling errors, which aided their own cause and increased their confidence considerably.

Indeed, it was the home side which produced the first of a number of scoring opportunities, in the second minute when right winger, Myles-Dalton Harrop, was unable to take advantage of an extremely awkwardly bouncing ball from an end-of-set kick to his corner.

With nothing to show for this Warrington took the opportunity to open the scoring, two minutes later, when they forced an overlap on their left flank to score in the corner.  They then succeeded in doubling their score to eight points, on twelve minutes, with another try wide out to the touchline.

Harvey Livett’s superb kick-off found open ground and bounced into touch, thereby securing the Red Devils unexpected possession in ideal territory, and from the ensuing attack James Greenwood forced his way over and twisted round to ground the ball to the referee’s satisfaction.  Stand-in goal kicker, Livett, proved to be a more than adequate replacement, landing all three of his attempts, some from the most difficult positions.

The next fifteen minutes saw the Wolves mount a succession of attacks which had their hosts at full stretch and pinned down in their own twenty metre area, staving off each attempt to increase the winning margin.  In fact, it was the 32nd minute before the Wolves eventually managed to cross the line between the posts and take the score to 6-14.

Three minutes later, an impromptu football match, started by Warrington hacking on a loose ball and then less successfully continuing to try to control it with further kicks, was won by Rhys Williams who secured possession and returned play back to the Wolves end of the field.  A goal-line drop-out was forced, and Salford raced through for what looked like a simple try.  Too clean and simple for referee, Ben Thaler, however, who had spotted an obstruction in the build-up.

It was, nevertheless, the Reds who finished the stronger, adding to their points tally with a Livett penalty-goal in the 39th minute, to bring the half-time score to a most respectable, 8-14.

The second half started with yet another spell, this time of eight minutes, of the Salford players thwarting periods of Warrington attack, until the visitors got onto the end of a low kick into the in-goal area for a converted try.

The highlight for Salford of this second forty came on 59 mins, when Myles-Dalton Harrop was put in the clear, on his wing, and he romped over to gain some compensation for his earlier unrewarded attempt, and, despite the difficult angle, Livett had no problem in slotting over the extras.

Although they failed to trouble the scoreboard operator thereafter, they certainly did cause problems for the Wolves’ attack, limiting them to only two further converted tries, during the period in which more experienced sides usually rachet up a quite overwhelming score, in such seemingly uneven contests.

Even the final score went contrary to the context surrounding it.  Having denied the visitors a score yet again, on the 79th minute, this time by preventing the prospective scorer from grounding the ball over the line, the Reds suffered the cruel twist of fate of having a well-intended pass to the right flank intercepted, leading to a winning margin, which failed to reflect the true balance of the game.

It was, nevertheless, a great experience for all of the players making their debuts, and credit must also go to the more experienced members of the side, who similarly rose to the occasion to provide direction and support for the newcomers, thus making it a truly, all-round team effort.

RED DEVILS IN DEPTH: SALFORD V HUDDERSFIELD

RED DEVILS IN DEPTH: SALFORD V HUDDERSFIELD

For a full forty minutes, the Red Devils shone as brightly as the afternoon’s sun in the middle of a heatwave, as they put behind them their disappointment at Headingley, last week, after only two minutes, in this week’s crucial victory over Huddersfield.

We all know, now, after weeks of experiencing and enjoying it, just what fabulous and scintillating rugby this current Salford team can produce.  That they did so in front of the Channel 4 cameras giving nation-wide terrestrial television coverage of those skills was as good as anyone could have hoped for.

Deon Cross, it was, who made the first initial break of the game, after slick handling had sped the ball from the left wing to the right, and the timing of his pass to Ken Sio gave the winger a clear run to the line, for the first score.

Joe Burgess’s punishing of a Giants’ error, with a near eighty metre break away try, five minutes later, was followed, with some incredible football and handling skills from Kallum Watkins, to ground Brodie Croft’s initial low kick through, which, with two successful Marc Sneyd conversions, put the Reds well in charge at 16-0, after only twelve minutes.

Indeed, the only blip in the first half proceedings came in the 18th minute, when Burgess was deprived of possession by McQueen who went over for an unconverted Huddersfield try, but further Salford scores from Ryan Brierley off an inside, overhead pass from Sio, and then ten minutes later Sneyd’s kick, this time into the in-goal area, being grounded by Tim Lafai, again converted by Sneyd, more than eradicated that.

So far, so good, but a completely different type of game awaited them in the second half, which required significant adaptation of their approach, and which they delivered most convincingly – all the more so as the half wore on.

An extended interval had certainly presented the Giant with sufficient time to address certain issues, and with the absence of Brodie Croft in the sin-bin for the first nine minutes, they returned determined to make their extra man paid dividends, whilst the Reds, realising the challenge facing them in those early stages, had a new focus of protecting that mid-match lead by means of a secure defence.

The extent to which they would be successful was indicated by the fact that even against twelve men, it was into the seventh minute before the visitors succeeded in crossing the Salford line, and although they scored once more, shortly after Croft’s return, they had been building towards it for some time.

That such a well-drilled side as Huddersfield then went almost thirty minutes without managing a further single point is great testament to the Reds’ resilience and commitment to the cause, especially when the game was played in a temperature of over thirty degrees, which was far more suited to attacking play than dour defending, but, with Huddersfield dominating possession, there was no alternative option for them.

The exuberance the Giants showed at pulling back to within ten points took them through the next ten minutes, aided by a number of Salford handling errors, but gradually their energy levels began to fall away, and the Reds began to look more and more in control of the situation.

The very sensible addition of two points, to stretch their lead to two converted scores, were attained as a result of Sneyd’s 63rd minute penalty kick from forty metres out, and provided the basis for him to be able to kick an important drop-goal, eleven minutes later, which probably sank the Giants’ spirits completely – their uphill struggle then becoming a three-score mountain to climb, in limited time and in still-climbing temperatures.

A final try from Harvey Livett, from yet another of Sneyd’s kicks, this time into the left corner, merely served to underline the Red Devils’ superiority, on the day.  Superior they were in flamboyance and entertainment, which was so delightful and thrilling to watch, but also superior in the hard work of tackling and defending, without which all the fine tries of that first forty might have been for nothing.

RED DEVILS IN DEPTH: SALFORD V HUDDERSFIELD

RED DEVILS IN DEPTH: SALFORD V HUDDERSFIELD

For a full forty minutes, the Red Devils shone as brightly as the afternoon’s sun in the middle of a heatwave, as they put behind them their disappointment at Headingley, last week, after only two minutes, in this week’s crucial victory over Huddersfield.

We all know, now, after weeks of experiencing and enjoying it, just what fabulous and scintillating rugby this current Salford team can produce.  That they did so in front of the Channel 4 cameras giving nation-wide terrestrial television coverage of those skills was as good as anyone could have hoped for.

Deon Cross, it was, who made the first initial break of the game, after slick handling had sped the ball from the left wing to the right, and the timing of his pass to Ken Sio gave the winger a clear run to the line, for the first score.

Joe Burgess’s punishing of a Giants’ error, with a near eighty metre break away try, five minutes later, was followed, with some incredible football and handling skills from Kallum Watkins, to ground Brodie Croft’s initial low kick through, which, with two successful Marc Sneyd conversions, put the Reds well in charge at 16-0, after only twelve minutes.

Indeed, the only blip in the first half proceedings came in the 18th minute, when Burgess was deprived of possession by McQueen who went over for an unconverted Huddersfield try, but further Salford scores from Ryan Brierley off an inside, overhead pass from Sio, and then ten minutes later Sneyd’s kick, this time into the in-goal area, being grounded by Tim Lafai, again converted by Sneyd, more than eradicated that.

So far, so good, but a completely different type of game awaited them in the second half, which required significant adaptation of their approach, and which they delivered most convincingly – all the more so as the half wore on.

An extended interval had certainly presented the Giant with sufficient time to address certain issues, and with the absence of Brodie Croft in the sin-bin for the first nine minutes, they returned determined to make their extra man paid dividends, whilst the Reds, realising the challenge facing them in those early stages, had a new focus of protecting that mid-match lead by means of a secure defence.

The extent to which they would be successful was indicated by the fact that even against twelve men, it was into the seventh minute before the visitors succeeded in crossing the Salford line, and although they scored once more, shortly after Croft’s return, they had been building towards it for some time.

That such a well-drilled side as Huddersfield then went almost thirty minutes without managing a further single point is great testament to the Reds’ resilience and commitment to the cause, especially when the game was played in a temperature of over thirty degrees, which was far more suited to attacking play than dour defending, but, with Huddersfield dominating possession, there was no alternative option for them.

The exuberance the Giants showed at pulling back to within ten points took them through the next ten minutes, aided by a number of Salford handling errors, but gradually their energy levels began to fall away, and the Reds began to look more and more in control of the situation.

The very sensible addition of two points, to stretch their lead to two converted scores, were attained as a result of Sneyd’s 63rd minute penalty kick from forty metres out, and provided the basis for him to be able to kick an important drop-goal, eleven minutes later, which probably sank the Giants’ spirits completely – their uphill struggle then becoming a three-score mountain to climb, in limited time and in still-climbing temperatures.

A final try from Harvey Livett, from yet another of Sneyd’s kicks, this time into the left corner, merely served to underline the Red Devils’ superiority, on the day.  Superior they were in flamboyance and entertainment, which was so delightful and thrilling to watch, but also superior in the hard work of tackling and defending, without which all the fine tries of that first forty might have been for nothing.

RED DEVILS IN DEPTH: SALFORD V WAKEFIELD

As the visiting Wakefield swept into an early 0-6 lead after a mere three minutes of play, in last Sunday’s Super League encounter, the signs for a Salford victory seemed somewhat sparse, and no-one could possibly have predicted the amazing about turn, which was about to manifest itself.

This had been an eagerly awaited match ever since the Red Devils had been pipped at the post, back in April in their away fixture, at Belle Vue.  More recently, however, the tightness of the two teams’ league status had turned the game into a ‘must win’ fixture for both sides.

Besides that opening try proving to be a complete red-herring, as far as the result was concerned, it also proved to be a wake-up call for the home side, who responded with what must have been their most outstanding performance, and subsequent victory, in the past two seasons.  Once the momentum began to swing in their favour there was absolutely no stopping them, and the points started to accrue at the most remarkable speed.

Overwhelming victories often lead to the debate over whether it was good attack or poor defence which was the dominant reason for the outcome.  Not on this occasion, however, because there could be no gainsaying the incredibly impressive attacking force into which the Salford attack turned.  That all but two of their tries were scored by backs, and five of them by wingers is testament in itself to that.  Wakefield’s  defence just had no chance of coping with it.

Tries galore was the outcome, and the skill, grace, and clinicity, with which these were forged simply had to be marvelled at.  They sprang from virtually every aspect of the game – in-goal kicks, directly from scrums, goal-line drop-outs, penalties, well-supported clean breaks – all of these proved to be the starting point for one or other of the thirteen tries.

The ones which were the most impressive and enjoyable, however, were those, predominantly in the first half, in which the absolutely fabulous, slick, handling saw the ball swept from one side of the field to the other, with a precision, and also variations, that were so beautiful in their execution, that they had to be seen to be believed.  The position of each player in the line, on each occasion, was centimetre perfect, and the timings of each and every pass were impeccable.  They had to be to foil the Wakefield defence as frequently as they did.

And what of the Wakefield defence?  Well, they certainly will not have conceded willingly, when you consider just what was at stake.  They simply had the misfortune of coming up against a team, which, on the day, was absolutely on fire, and totally dominated possession.  We can all remember periods, in which they successfully contained the Reds in their own thirty metre area, until an end-of-set kick relieved the pressure.

There is a limit to the amount of defending anyone can do, though, and with the amount of possession Salford enjoyed, Trinity’s energy levels understandably fell as each half progressed, and particularly in the second half, there was a small number of clean breaks which came as a result of the visitors’ fatigue.  They, nevertheless, still managed to score a second try, on 51 minutes.

A total of seventy-four points does not come predominantly from poor defence, however, it has to come primarily from the exceptionally high quality of the attack in order for it to mount up to such a massive scoreline, and this is undoubtedly what happened on this occasion

There even were a couple of occasions when it looked as though another try was on the way only for it to be chalked off by the referee.  Harvey Livett failed to ground cleanly Marc Sneyd’s in-goal kick on 8 mins, while Sneyd himself was given exactly the same judgement in the second half, and was also called back, later, whilst on his way to the line, for a forward pass.

In addition, there was a considerable amount of off-the-ball work, which probably went unnoticed, but which was quite instrumental in the victory.  An end-of-set kick towards the Wakefield try-line, for example, was recovered by the fullback, only to receive the full force of Jack Ormondroyd’s charging tackle, with the ball being knocked out of his grasp, thereby acquiring possession for Ryan Brierley 62nd minute try.

The challenge for the team now is to put this game behind them and focus on next Sunday’s match at Warrington.  This scoreline, marvellous as it is, will have no relevance then, and the 0-0 score, from which both teams will start, will need all the hard work that any game needs, in order to bring back the points from the Halliwell Jones.

RED DEVILS IN DEPTH: SALFORD V WAKEFIELD

As the visiting Wakefield swept into an early 0-6 lead after a mere three minutes of play, in last Sunday’s Super League encounter, the signs for a Salford victory seemed somewhat sparse, and no-one could possibly have predicted the amazing about turn, which was about to manifest itself.

This had been an eagerly awaited match ever since the Red Devils had been pipped at the post, back in April in their away fixture, at Belle Vue.  More recently, however, the tightness of the two teams’ league status had turned the game into a ‘must win’ fixture for both sides.

Besides that opening try proving to be a complete red-herring, as far as the result was concerned, it also proved to be a wake-up call for the home side, who responded with what must have been their most outstanding performance, and subsequent victory, in the past two seasons.  Once the momentum began to swing in their favour there was absolutely no stopping them, and the points started to accrue at the most remarkable speed.

Overwhelming victories often lead to the debate over whether it was good attack or poor defence which was the dominant reason for the outcome.  Not on this occasion, however, because there could be no gainsaying the incredibly impressive attacking force into which the Salford attack turned.  That all but two of their tries were scored by backs, and five of them by wingers is testament in itself to that.  Wakefield’s  defence just had no chance of coping with it.

Tries galore was the outcome, and the skill, grace, and clinicity, with which these were forged simply had to be marvelled at.  They sprang from virtually every aspect of the game – in-goal kicks, directly from scrums, goal-line drop-outs, penalties, well-supported clean breaks – all of these proved to be the starting point for one or other of the thirteen tries.

The ones which were the most impressive and enjoyable, however, were those, predominantly in the first half, in which the absolutely fabulous, slick, handling saw the ball swept from one side of the field to the other, with a precision, and also variations, that were so beautiful in their execution, that they had to be seen to be believed.  The position of each player in the line, on each occasion, was centimetre perfect, and the timings of each and every pass were impeccable.  They had to be to foil the Wakefield defence as frequently as they did.

And what of the Wakefield defence?  Well, they certainly will not have conceded willingly, when you consider just what was at stake.  They simply had the misfortune of coming up against a team, which, on the day, was absolutely on fire, and totally dominated possession.  We can all remember periods, in which they successfully contained the Reds in their own thirty metre area, until an end-of-set kick relieved the pressure.

There is a limit to the amount of defending anyone can do, though, and with the amount of possession Salford enjoyed, Trinity’s energy levels understandably fell as each half progressed, and particularly in the second half, there was a small number of clean breaks which came as a result of the visitors’ fatigue.  They, nevertheless, still managed to score a second try, on 51 minutes.

A total of seventy-four points does not come predominantly from poor defence, however, it has to come primarily from the exceptionally high quality of the attack in order for it to mount up to such a massive scoreline, and this is undoubtedly what happened on this occasion

There even were a couple of occasions when it looked as though another try was on the way only for it to be chalked off by the referee.  Harvey Livett failed to ground cleanly Marc Sneyd’s in-goal kick on 8 mins, while Sneyd himself was given exactly the same judgement in the second half, and was also called back, later, whilst on his way to the line, for a forward pass.

In addition, there was a considerable amount of off-the-ball work, which probably went unnoticed, but which was quite instrumental in the victory.  An end-of-set kick towards the Wakefield try-line, for example, was recovered by the fullback, only to receive the full force of Jack Ormondroyd’s charging tackle, with the ball being knocked out of his grasp, thereby acquiring possession for Ryan Brierley 62nd minute try.

The challenge for the team now is to put this game behind them and focus on next Sunday’s match at Warrington.  This scoreline, marvellous as it is, will have no relevance then, and the 0-0 score, from which both teams will start, will need all the hard work that any game needs, in order to bring back the points from the Halliwell Jones.

RED DEVILS IN DEPTH:  HULL KR V SALFORD

Not for the first time, a team in a rich vein of form paid the price for a fixture-free weekend, with a loss of momentum and subsequently, a loss of quality in their performance.  That certainly appeared to be the case with Salford, in their outing to East Hull to take on the Robins, following two fine home victories over Leeds and Castleford.

The lapse of seventeen days between the last of those, and yesterday, was enough to take a little of the shine off their performances, as was exemplified by their failure to capitalise on the most clear-cut of try-scoring opportunities, six minutes into the game.

Fine handling from Amir Bourouh, Tim Lafae, Alex Gerrard, and Brodie Croft, virtually on their own try-line, successfully sent Deon Croft, supported by Ken Sio on his inside, sprinting down the right wing.  With only the covering Ethan Ryan to beat, a simple two on one was all that was required, but the pair, who normally have such a great understanding with each other on attack, had too much time to think about it and consequently over-complicated it with two, almost unnecessary, passes.

In fairness, Ryan did extremely well in the situation by not committing himself, totally to any tackle, and the chance petered out as the attacking pair ran out of room along the touch line.  The contrasting effects on the two sides, however, was the most significant outcome, with the home-side growing in confidence, and, soon after, taking a ten-point lead, with back-to-back tries.

Their tally continued to grow throughout the half to nineteen, through two goals, a try, and a drop-goal, but the Red Devils did manage to pull back six points with a converted try of their own, on 27 mins.  Hull had great difficulty in dealing with Harvey Livett’s kick into the in-goal area, with two players fumbling it for Tim Lafae to pounce upon.  Marc Sneyd added the goal-kick.

Singular as that score was, it was sufficient to put the visitors back in contention, and with only thirteen points separating the two sides at half time, confidence still remained that Salford could come back in the second half, just as they had done against much greater odds, at Wakefield.

Unfortunately, that was not to be.  A no-look flip-pass, close to the Robins’ try line, which might have initiated a try for Salford, was intercepted, and quickly led to their hosts extending their lead by a further six points, and, from that point, events turned significantly in their favour.

Most crucial of all were the two, virtually back-to-back, sin-binnings of Tyler Dupree and Livett, which meant that the rest of the team were left facing the buoyant KR with only twelve men for twenty minutes, during which time the home side exploited their numerical advantage, and continued to build up a quite commanding lead.

The Red Devils did however round off the match with a further couple of tries, sandwiching a final six-pointer for Hull, which gave the Salford fans something to cheer about, before their long journey home, Deon Cross latching onto the end of another kick into the in-goal area, and then Joe Burgess benefitting from Lafae’s interception to put him away,

Six weeks ago, the Red Devils most impressively improved their performances in the league game at Wigan.  This Friday will be the ideal opportunity for them to repeat that feat when the Cup holders visit the A J Bell for the return encounter.

Salford Red Devils and Advanced Steel renew sponsorship

Salford Red Devils are delighted to announce the renewal of our sponsorship agreement with Advanced Steel Services, for what will be a fifth year of business with the UK-wide steel stockholders.

Advanced Steel first became sponsors of the club in 2017, and will continue to feature on our official kit for 2022 as they have done for the last five years  – 2017 and 2018 on the shorts and 2019, 2020 and 2021 on the shirt.

Managing director for Advanced Steel, Carl Grundy, commented: “Advanced Steel are very proud to be a shirt sponsor again for the Salford Red Devils during the 2022 season, we have been in partnership with the club for the previous 5 years and there have been so many highs in such a short time.

“It was a very easy decision to make to continue for another year and we are excited to see what lies ahead with the development of the club. I have regular contact with Paul King and George Harborne and the vision they have for the club, backed up with support of the Salford fans, can only mean it will be another high this season.”

Salford Red Devils executive chairman Paul King said: “We are delighted to announce the continuation of our partnership with a prestigious business like Advanced Steel. Carl is a superb advocate of the club and an excellent sounding board for me on a fairly regular basis.

“I look forward to what 2022 can bring, with the support of partners like Advanced Steel helping us realise our ambitions.”

Player sponsors of Harvey Livett for 2022, Advanced Steel, who have 150 years of experience, are part of the Barrett Steel Group and have the backing therefore of the UK’s largest independent steel stockholder with their own transport fleet, multi-million pound processing facilities and nearly 100,000 tonnes of steel stock available to you next day.

To find out more about Advanced Steel, visit www.advancedsteel.co.uk

CDX Security announced as new Club Partner

Salford Red Devils are pleased to announce that CDX Security have joined the club as a new Official Partner.

CDX Security is an SIA accredited supplier of security services offering proactive management and innovative security solutions. With a head office in Warrington, CDX Security also have offices in London, Leeds and the West Midlands.

As part of the new partnership, CDX Security will feature on the sleeve of the Red Devils kits for the remainder of the 2021 and the entirety of the 2022 season.

Salford Red Devils Executive Chairman Paul King commented: “We are delighted to welcome CDX Security as a partner of the club. CDX Security and their Chief Executive John Roddy are huge supporters of the rugby league game, and have demonstrated this once again with their support for Salford Red Devils.”

Commenting on the newest CDX Security tie up, who boast England Head Coach Shaun Wane as a strategic advisor, Chief Executive John Roddy added: “‘We were delighted to be contacted by Paul King earlier in the week and advised that there was an opportunity to provide further sponsorship with the Salford Red Devils.

“We have enjoyed good relations with Salford for a few years now and have sponsored a couple of games during the past three seasons, we have also enjoyed sponsoring Harvey Livett, this season.

“The club are excellent to deal with and have always made our attendance at games, a first class experience, for the CDX Security team and our invited guests, ensuring a quality experience.

“We wish the club all the very best for the remainder of the 2021 season and we look forward to being part of the 2022 season and having the CDX Security logo on the playing shirts.”

To find out more information on our newest partner, visit www.cdxsec.com.

MATCH REPORT | SALFORD RED DEVILS 34-8 LEIGH CENTURIONS | FRIDAY 23 APRIL 2021

Salford Red Devils marked the return of Betfred Super League action at the The Salford Stadium, with a 34-8 victory over neighbours Leigh Centurions.

After trailing early on and going into the break two points behind the visitors, a strong performance in the second forty ensured Richard Marshall secured his first Betfred Super League win at the helm at Salford.

It took only six minutes for the first try of the game and it was Leigh who struck first, Matthew Russell receiving the ball down the left wing and grounding near the corner.

Salford took the lead, however, just over 15 minutes later through James Greenwood, who had only been on the field a matter of minutes in replace of the injured Matt Costello, before he powered over the Leigh line to the left of the sticks.

Leigh responded just before the half-hour mark, again finding success down the left flank and this time it was Iain Thornley who scored for the Centurions.

Half time: Salford Red Devils 6-8 Leigh Centurions

Salford came out looking the livelier outfit in the second forty and Kevin Brown put the Red Devils back in front in the 50th minute, finding a gap in the Leigh line and darting over to the right.

15 minutes later, Krisnan Inu intercepted a Leigh pass and just managed to bat the ball to Sio, who was too quick f0r the Centurions, running almost the length of the field to ground the ball down the right and pick up his third Betfred Super League try in four games.

James Greenwood, who had looked threatening ever since he came on, broke the line in the 70th minute and fed Harvey Livett who, in turn, fed Brown for his second try of the game, this time towards the left of the sticks.

Livett set up his second try in as many minutes, this time feeding Chris Atkin for his first Betfred Super League try of the season.

Livett picked up a try of his own just before the hooter, and just minutes after he saw a try ruled out for obstruction, after some great passing down the left set the number 20 up for his second Betfred Super League try in two consecutive games.

Salford welcome Castleford Tigers to the The Salford Stadium in a week’s time, in Round 5 of the Betfred Super League. Sign up to RDTV to hear everything Richard Marshall had to say in tonight’s post-match press conference.

Full time: Salford Red Devils 34-8 Leigh Centurions

Salford Red Devils: Kear, Sio, Inu, Costello, Williams, Lolohea, Brown, Mossop, Patton, Ikahihifo, Livett, Roberts, Wells, Greenwood, Lussick, Atkin, Burke.

Leigh Centurions: Mullen, Russell, Gelling, Thornley, Tierney, Reynolds, Brierley, McCarthy, Hood, Flower, Hellewell, Thompson, Bell, Peats, Ioane, Gerrard, Gee.

Salford tries: Greenwood, Brown, Sio, Brown, Atkin, Livett

Salford goals: Inu (5/6)

Leigh tries: Russell, Thornley

Referee: James Child

Image credit: Steve McCormick

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